Seung Yul Oh: MOAMOA, A Decade opens at City Gallery

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Seung Yul Oh's MOAMOA, A Decade

Media Release: May, 2014. 


The large high-energy sculptures and playful shapes of Korean-New Zealand artist Seung Yul Oh are coming to City Gallery Wellington. MOAMOA, A Decade opens 31st May and runs until 24th August 2014.

With its oversized interactive toys, illusionistic imitation-food sculptures and explosions, MOAMOA will bring joy and escapism to audiences of all ages. 
MOAMOA (Korean for ‘gather together’) reflects Oh’s passion for rejuvenation: nothing is allowed to sit still or be quiet.  The show features videos, paintings, and interactive inflatables, which will be a highlight for children. The video, The Ability to Blow Themselves Up, shows people blowing up balloons until they explode. MOAMOA also features Oddooki, ‘a playful collection of egg-shaped birds that rock and chime’.

The Guardian (UK) described Oh as a ‘rising star of the Asian art market’.

Born in Seoul in 1981, Oh gained a Master of Fine Arts from Elam in Auckland, in 2005. He achieved early fame with an exhibition in which he deep-fried his paintings. In 2010, Oh’s exhibition, Bogle Bogle, was at the Dowse Art Museum and he made his first public work, Globgob, a cluster of nine egg-shapes, installed in Teed Street, Newmarket, Auckland. In 2011, he was the second recipient of the Harriet Friedlander Residency, enabling him to live and work in New York. He currently divides his time between Auckland and Seoul.

MOAMOA is the first survey exhibition of Oh’s work and is a joint project by City Gallery Wellington and Dunedin Public Art Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Aaron Lister of City Gallery Wellington and Aaron Kreisler of Dunedin Public Art Gallery.


Seung Yul Oh:  MOAMOA, A Decade
31 May – 24 August, 2014
City Gallery Wellington | Free
CityGallery.org.nz

For all media enquiries and images, please contact: Olivia Lacey
 Olivia.Lacey@wmt.org.nz
04 801 4258 | 021 022 40312

Image: Seung Yul Oh, Oddooki, 2008. Collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Photographer: Max Bellamy