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  • Date: 22 May 2017
  • Time: Monday, 6pm
  • Cost: $40 / $35 Concession, Friends and Litcrawlers

Chris Kraus is author of I Love Dick, Aliens and Anorexia, and the recently re-released Torpor. The New Yorker says this of her novels: 'Taken together, Kraus’s books summon “contradictory, multiple perspectives” … they approach a recurring consciousness from different angles, dip into the trajectory of a life at different moments.’ The moments, the emotion and the perspectives explored through and across her writing include allusion and reflection on a migrant life in Wellington, where she graduated from Victoria University and had an early career as a journalist at the Sunday Times and Evening Post before leaving for New York to become an artist.

Author and artist Chris Kraus returns to Wellington for a one-off, intimate conversation about her life and work. Chris talks with Claire Murdoch.

Refreshments served.

Presented in partnership with Auckland Writers Festival and Pirate & Queen.

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  • Date: 18 July 2017
  • Time: Tuesday, 10:30am
  • Cost: Free

Join us for a mid-morning tour of Colin McCahon: On Going Out with the Tide in a baby-friendly environment for engaging with art. Gallery Babes is best suited to babies aged 0–12 months. 

Bookings essential.

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  • Date: 14 June 2017
  • Time: Wednesday, 10:30am
  • Cost: Free

Join us for a mid-morning tour of Martino Gamper: 100 Chairs in 100 Days in a baby-friendly environment for engaging with art. 

Gallery Babes is best suited to babies aged 0–12 months.

Bookings essential. BOOK NOW

  • Date: 1 July 2017
  • Time: Saturday, 3.30pm
  • Cost: Free

Specific cultural politics sustained McCahon’s painted engagement with Māori subjects in the late 1960s and 1970s. Pākehā art historian Damian Skinner asks what these artworks say to (and about) Pākehā as Aotearoa moves into a post-Treaty-settlement moment, and the dynamics of the relationship between Māori and Pākehā are once again on the move.

In association with Colin McCahon: On Going Out with the Tide

  • Date: 1 July 2017
  • Time: Saturday, 3pm
  • Cost: Free

McCahon’s relationship with writer John Caselberg was long lasting and important. Writer and curator Peter Simpson responds to On Going Out with the Tide, reflecting on Caselberg within the context of McCahon’s other sources such as Matire Kereama’s The Tail of the Fish and the poetry of James K Baxter.

  • Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: Saturday, 3pm
  • Cost: Free

Composer and writer Robin Maconie considers McCahon's work in relation to music and orality. 

In association with Colin McCahon: On Going Out with the Tide

  • Date: 16 May 2017
  • Time: Tuesday, 10:30am
  • Cost: Free

Join us for a mid-morning tour of Petra Cortright: RUNNING NEO-GEO GAMES UNDER MAME in a baby-friendly environment for engaging with art.
Gallery Babes is best suited to babies aged 0–12 months.

Bookings essential. BOOK NOW

  • Date: 3 July 2017
  • Time: Monday, 6pm
  • Cost: Free

Some saw the Department of Conservation’s recent demolition of Māori architect John Scott’s Āniwaniwa Visitor Centre as the destruction of an important part of New Zealand’s architectural history. Scott’s son, designer/carver Jacob Scott, and writers and curators Gregory O’Brien and Peter Simpson discuss the controversial origins and history of the Visitor Centre and its relationship with McCahon’s 1975 Urewera Mural.

Part of the Deane Lectures series, presented in association with Colin McCahon: On Going Out with the Tide and supported by the Deane Endowment Trust.

Cash bar.

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  • Date: 29 June 2017
  • Time: Thursday, 6pm
  • Cost: Free

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Rt Hon Jim Bolger and Ngāi Tūhoe Chief Negotiator Tāmati Kruger discuss the Treaty settlement process. Both sit on Te Urewera Board.

Part of the Deane Lectures series, presented in association with Colin McCahon: On Going Out with the Tide and supported by the Deane Endowment Trust.

Cash bar. 

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  • Date: 24 June 2017
  • Time: Saturday, 2.30pm
  • Cost: Free

McCahon's work aspires to the status of prophecy, and prophecy runs all the way through it. In this talk, Laurence Simmons argues that McCahon’s interest in the voice is not as a ventriloquist. He is not interested in merely inhabiting another voice from a safe distance. And this is undoubtedly why, Simmons says, McCahon does not merely depict the great Māori prophets Te Whiti and Tohu Kākahi in his Parihaka Triptych (1972), but actually identifies with them: he both understands his own work as a similar prophecy, and even tries to make this work a kind of self-prophecy, to actually performatively bring their prophecies about in his work. 

Laurence Simmons is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Auckland. He has written widely on contemporary New Zealand art and is currently writing a book with Rex Butler on McCahon’s afterlife.

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