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  • Date: 30 September 2016
  • Time: Friday, 12.15pm
  • Cost: Free

Off to WOW? Join us for a 20-minute textile and fashion-centric tour of Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs.

No bookings required. Meet in main foyer. 


Tours will be held on the following days also:

September | Thursday 22, Friday 23, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 

October | Wednesday 5, Thursday 6, and Friday 7.

  • Date: 29 September 2016
  • Time: Thursday, 12.15pm
  • Cost: Free

Off to WOW? Join us for a 20 -minute textile and fashion-centric tour of Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs.

No bookings required. Meet in main foyer. 


Tours will be held on the following days also:

September | Thursday 22, Friday 23, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 

October | Wednesday 5, Thursday 6, and Friday 7.

  • Date: 23 September 2016
  • Time: Friday, 12.15pm
  • Cost: Free

Off to WOW? Join us for a 20-minute textile and fashion-centric tour of Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs.

No bookings required. Meet in the main foyer.


Tours will be held on the following days also:

September | Thursday 22, Friday 23, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 

October | Wednesday 5, Thursday 6, and Friday 7

  • Date: 22 September 2016
  • Time: Thursday, 12.15pm
  • Cost: Free

Off to WOW? Join us for a 20-minute textile and fashion-centric tour of Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs.

No bookings required. Meet in main foyer. 


Tours will be held on the following days also:

September | Thursday 22, Friday 23, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 

October | Wednesday 5, Thursday 6, and Friday 7 October.

  • Date: 20 September 2016
  • Time: Tuesday, 6pm
  • Cost: Free

Professor Thomas Crow (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) talks about the parallels between the works of Sister Corita and New Zealand’s own Colin McCahon.

Refreshments served. 

In partnership with Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

About Thomas Crow

Crow is the Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art, and Associate Provost for the Arts at New York University. He has authored a number of publications including his most recent book, The Long March of Pop: Art, Design, and Music, 1930–1995, published by Yale University Press in January 2015. 

Before his appointment at a New York University, Crow was director of the Getty Research Institute, professor of art history at the University of Southern California, the Robert Lehman Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, and professor and chair in the history of art at the University of Sussex.

Read full bio here


Thomas Crow Talks Pop Art

Text from Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Crow is highly regarded for his incisive and intriguing perspectives. He’ll bring fresh ideas to the Harvard Art Museums on December 10, when he delivers the lecture Reinventing Religious Art in the 1960s. Presented in conjunction with the special exhibition Corita Kent and the Language of Pop, Crow’s lecture examines parallels between Kent’s theologically meaningful art and the work of New Zealand artist Colin McCahon (1919–1987). Crow recently spoke with us about McCahon, Kent, and pop art.

Many casual art viewers may be unfamiliar with Colin McCahon’s work. What’s important to know about him?

He is, to me, an unquestionably major 20th-century artist. Because he lived out his whole career in New Zealand, and had very minimal exposure in the United States, he has remained virtually unknown in the northern hemisphere.

However, McCahon is viewed as a founding figure of modern art in the Antipodes. There’s a flourishing art scene in New Zealand that’s indebted to him, in the same way that the American art scene is indebted to Jackson Pollock or that the English art scene is indebted to Francis Bacon. He’s an artist you would put on the same level as a Cy Twombly or a Jasper Johns. He has a major following and prestige in Australia. I was reading recently that a number of Australian celebrities, like Cate Blanchett and Nicole Kidman, are avid collectors of McCahon’s art.

What led you to compare McCahon’s work with Corita Kent’s?

When you put his art side-by-side with Kent’s, both have much in common: religious texts, obviously, and a bold graphic alphabet. I think Kent and McCahon count as about the only artists you can put forward as credibly addressing theological questions. To hear about them at the same time and to see their work together will be fresh, I think, and maybe surprising to people in the audience.

Do you think anything is changing today in how we understand pop art?

I hope so. I wrote a long book that just came out this year, The Long March of Pop: Art, Music, and Design, 1930–1995, trying to put understanding of pop on a broader, more interesting footing. . . . [I]t addresses [among other topics] looking beyond the confines of gallery or museum art and including graphic design in the focus of art history.

In both Corita Kent and the Language of Pop at the Harvard Art Museums and Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent [a comprehensive exhibition that traveled to a number of U.S. museums in 2014 and 2015], there’s something of a breakthrough here: design is part of the picture in a way that it hadn’t been before. Kent is an exemplary figure to lead this change, which I hope will bring more designers into the vision of fine art institutions.

  • Date: 18 September 2016
  • Time: Sunday, 10am-4pm | FULLY BOOKED
  • Cost: $20-$25

Artist Simon Cuming leads a workshop in screen printing inspired by Sister Corita Kent's bold and vibrant work.

Refreshments served.

$25 General Admission
$20 Gallery Friends / Concession

Book Now | This workshop is now fully booked

  • Date: 11 September 2016
  • Time: Sunday, 2pm
  • Cost: Free

Fran Wilde, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Therese O’Connell and Mary O’Regan remember growing up Catholic in Aotearoa New Zealand, over twenty years after they were interviewed for Jane Tolerton’s book Convent Girls.

  • Date: 6 October 2016
  • Time: Thursday, 5-10pm
  • Cost: Koha

We start the month with art, music, food, beer and wine at October Tuatara Open Late. 

It's your last chance to see exhibtions Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs and Sister Corita's Summer of Love after dark. Both shows close Sunday 16 October. 

Focus on Francis Upritchard’s figurative sculptures in a ‘Life’-drawing session with artist Emma Febrve-Richards.
Writers Tessa Laird and Bianca Zander talk psychedelia, dystopias and museology in response to Upritchard’s works.

In the Auditorium, watch Ira Cohen's psychedelic romp The Invasion of the Thunderbolt Pagoda, then the 1969 musical comedy Change of Habit. Starring Elvis Presley and Mary Tyler-Moore, the film follows three Catholic nuns who are sent to a rough inner-city neighbourhood dressed as lay missionaries to work at a clinic run by a young doctor. Their lives become complicated by city realities, curmudgeonly priests, societal views and love.

There'll also be music from DJ B.Lo, supper treats from Laundry and a cash bar serving Tuatara beer, Seresin wine and Six Barrel Soda. 

Timetable

From 5pm DJ B.Lo, burgers from Laundry and cash bar

5pm- 8pm Film screening: Ira Cohen’s The Invasion of Thunderbolt Pagoda (1968 | 31min)

6pm Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs exhibition tour (30min)

6-9pm “Life”-drawing with Emma Febvre-Richards and Francis Upritchard’s figurative sculptures – drop-in

7.30pm Writers Tessa Laird and Bianca Zander talk psychedelia, dystopias and hippy communes in Francis Upritchard’s exhibition (30-40 mins)

8.15pm Film screening: Change of Habit (93min)

  • Date: 4 September 2016
  • Time: Sunday, 1-5pm
  • Cost: $20-$25

Zine-maker Caitlin Lynch, co-founder of FeminEast, (Wellington East Girls College feminist club) leads a workshop in collaborative zine-making, printing and distribution. 

Afternoon tea served.
In association with Sister Corita’s Summer of Love.

$25 General Admission
$20 Gallery Friends / Concession
Bookings essential: citygalleryevents@experiencewellington.co.nz


  • Date: 19 September 2016
  • Time: Monday, 6pm
  • Cost: Free

City Talks is an ongoing series presented in partnership with the New Zealand Institute of Architects Wellington Branch.

Bill McKay, author of Worship: A History of New Zealand Church Designpays tribute to some of  our most significant buildings of the last 200 years in this talk for Architecture Week. McKay invites us to consider the future of our church buildings in an era witnessing a decline in the relationship between spiritual and civic life. Given their fascinating history he asks how we identify which buildings we want to maintain and care for, and how we share the costs for earthquake strengthening and maintenance as communities are forced to reconsider how we value our built environment.

About 

Bill McKay has written and talked extensively on New Zealand architecture and urban design issues. His commentary and criticism over the last decade was recognised by the New Zealand Institute of Architects with a President's Award and Urbis Magazine named him Best Architectural Writer.  His previous book Beyond the State: NZ State Houses from Modest to Modern (with Andrea Stevens and Simon Devitt) was a 2014 NZ Post Book Awards finalist.

Bill McKays's visit to Wellington is supported by Penguin Random House Books. 

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