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City Gallery City Gallery Wellington

Past event

Contemporary Feminism: Sons of Feminism

2 July 2019

City Gallery and RNZ are back with a third series of lively panel discussions exploring Contemporary Feminism, inspired by our current exhibitions. Presented in partnership with RNZ and recorded for broadcast.

Eva Rothschild's video Boys and Sculpture shows a group of young boys dismantling the artist's work. Rothschild—a mother of three boys—takes pleasure in their joyous physicality. How much is their behaviour the product of nature, how much the product of nurture?

Chaired by Susie Ferguson, this panel asks how can we begin to unpack our narratives around the male/female brain? How has feminism changed the way we raise boys and how is it changing the men they become? How does parenting boys affect feminists? And how do boys see themselves through feminism? Panelists: Emily Writes, Salvatore Gargiulo, Dr Annette Henderson, and Kath Akuhata-Brown.

In association with Eva Rothschild: Kosmos.

Doors open 5.30pm. Cash bar open until 6pm and again after the panel discussion to continue the conversation.

The Contemporary Feminism: Art and/or Science panel takes place on Tuesday 25 June, 6pm.

 

Emily Writes is a writer, editor of The Spinoff Parents and mother of two. She is the author of two books, Rants in the Dark, which has been turned into a popular stage play, and Is it Bedtime Yet?, an anthology on parenting.

Salvatore Gargiulo QSO worked in secondary schools for forty years. While Principal at Nelson College, he worked closely with Celia Lashlie on the Good Man Project, part of her research for her book He’ll Be Ok: Growing Gorgeous Boys Into Good Men. Gargiulo is an advocate for boys' education and worked to address the gender performance gap in New Zealand education by developing strategies for teachers and parents.

Dr Annette Henderson is a psychologist researching social, cognitive, and language development in early childhood. She is a Senior Lecturer, Rutherford Discovery Fellow, and Director of the Early Learning Lab at the University of Auckland.

Kathryn Akuhata-Brown (Ngati Porou) is a mum, screenwriter, director and poet. Her formative years occurred during the rise of the Maori Rasta Movement. She has worked as a journalist for the Gisborne Herald and TVNZ, and for the last 30 years, her work has focused on the place of Maori in the world. She has been a consistent and constant voice in the New Zealand screen landscape as an advocate of Indigenous voices.