City Gallery City Gallery Wellington

Past exhibition

Andrew Drummond: Works 80

7 February–1 March 1981

Works 80 combines the organic and the electronic, performance, sculpture, and sound. Andrew Drummond says, 'the focus of the earth and the focus of our place on it and the relationship between the two is what I'm doing and it's done through energy.’ He produced the works during his 1980 Frances Hodgkins Fellowship in Dunedin. 

In Willow Dance, nine willow trees—still growing—are planted in soil in front of two videos of willows dancing in the wind. It is accompanied by a sound piece by Dunedin Mozart fellow Chris Cree Brown.

City Vein: Male is a response to a large outdoor environmental sculpture, Earth Vein: Female (1980), where Drummond inserted lengths of soft-core copper pipe 13cm under the ground along a disused water race near Lake Mahinerangi, west of Dunedin. City Vein: Male is a straight copper pipe running across the gallery, raised 13cm above the floor by stripped yellow forks and joined at various stations by beeswax bandages. At one end is an animal heart, at the other end a kidney. (Due to health-and-safety practicalities, the heart and kidney are not on display for the show’s full duration.)

Bandages appear elsewhere—Warrior is an outsized, bandaged, limp catapult. For Drummond the bandage is a contemporary symbol. ‘The reason for using the bandage is because it creates a whole myriad of pictures in people's minds: of closing something that's open, of healing, of a skin, of something you can put through and pull out—it's two-way, like a filter.’

Works 80 addresses the effect of man on the environment while anthropomorphising nature. In the Evening Post, Neil Rowe writes, 'There is much of the shaman in these installations and performances. Recurring American Indian motifs, stripped bark, stretched and marked animal skins, beeswax and bindings picked up during study in Canada are his stock and trade … This exhibition shows him [Drummond] at his best and demonstrates an extremely productive tenure as Frances Hodgkins Fellow.'